Long Lost Review: The Fall (2006)

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The Fall

Directed by: Tarsem Singh

In a hospital on the outskirts of 1920s Los Angeles, an injured stuntman begins to tell a fellow patient, a little girl with a broken arm, a fantastic story of five mythical heroes. Thanks to his fractured state of mind and her vivid imagination, the line between fiction and reality blurs as the tale advances.

Taken from IMDB

I’m changing it up a bit this month, so instead of a book, it’s an amazing movie that I don’t think enough people know about. The Fall is a visually stunning film that blurs the lines between cinema, story, truth, and lies – I absolutely loved this movie and just need to share my love for it.

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SLRG: Luck is No Lady by Amy Sandas

luckisnolady
Luck is No Lady

by Amy Sandas.

Publisher: link.

Goodreads: link.


Blurb: Gently bred Emma Chadwick always assumed she’d live and die the daughter of a gentleman. But when her father’s death reveals a world of staggering debt and dangerous moneylenders, she must risk her good name and put her talent for mathematics to use, taking a position as bookkeeper at London’s most notorious gambling hell. Surrounded by vice and corruption on all sides, it is imperative no one discovers Emma’s shameful secret or her reputation-and her life-will be ruined.

But Roderick Bentley, the hell’s sinfully wealthy owner, awakens a hunger Emma cannot deny. Drawn deep into an underworld of high stakes gambling and reckless overindulgence, she soon discovers that in order to win the love of a ruthless scoundrel, she will have to play the game…and give in to the pleasure of falling from grace.

Length: 382 pages.

Series: Fallen Ladies #1.

Genre: Romance. Historical.

Read as an: Paperback.


My Thoughts

I really enjoyed this book. The main character, Emma, is quite intelligent and was allowed to demonstrate this in an easy and respectful way. The romantic lead, Roderick, had a very accepting and almost nonchalant attitude towards Emma and her ‘scandalous’ behaviour.

The book is part of a trilogy that follows Emma’s two sisters, however I don’t think I will read these as the blurbs and characters didn’t grab my attention. Luck is No Lady was a sweet and smile inducing novel, I would really recommend this book for anyone looking for a good regency read.


Smut Level

Decent. I really liked the back and forth between these characters and the physical scenes were very focused on Emma.


Are there any romance novels that you love to read? Let me know in the comments, I would love to hear from you 🙂

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Long Lost Review: Snakes Among Sweet Flowers by Jason Huffman-Black

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Snakes Among Sweet Flowers

Jason Huffman-Black.

Two-time ex-con Camden Sanders has decided that Hog Mountain—an isolated community on the outskirts of Atlanta, Georgia—is the perfect place to continue running small scams without the threat of more prison time. But there are a few problems with this plan. One is the neighbourly citizens of Hog Mountain thwarting his dirty dealings at every turn with their kindness. Another is Jackson Rhodes, a closeted Hog Mountain police officer who can see right through Cam’s good ol’ boy act and plans to catch him red-handed despite the attraction they both can feel. But the biggest problem of all is that Cam’s past is threatening to catch up with him, and it could mean trouble for more than just himself.

Taken from book blurb

Okay so I had always intended to review this book because I loved it. When I first read Snakes Among Sweet Flowers, it was a highlight of the year and I gave it a re-read last year and it stood the test of time because I still loved it.

I am a big sucker for stories that feature down trodden, poor, or struggling characters. I do not know why I love them so much but I really enjoy seeing characters suffer (omg I am terrible) but still manage to fall in love. I especially love the stories where the problems of a character aren’t magically fixed by falling in love, they just have someone else to share the struggles.

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SLRG: A Strange and Mystifying Story Series by Tsuta Suzuki

A Strange and Mystifying Story Series

by Tsuta Suzuki.

Publisher: link.

Original Japanese title: Konoyo Ibun.

Goodreads: link.

Genre: Manga. Romance. M/M Romance.


Volumes 1&2:
In the immediate family of the story’s protagonist everyone seems to die early, and other relatives talk about a curse. When soon after his grandfather’s death he comes down with an incurable disease, and is overwhelmed by grief and loneliness, in desperation he remembers his grandfather’s last words — that somebody was watching over them. He can only find an odd fossil tooth where his grandfather had pointed, but when he picks it up and accidentally gets some of his blood on it, that summons a guardian spirit, who promises to cure him. Maybe he should be pleased, but said guardian has some strange methods for healing.

Volumes 3-7:
Tsumugi Shirota is your typical high school student. He’s handsome, kind, and for some strange reason, surprisingly adept at household chores. On his 16th birthday, a rather unusual but special guest comes to meet him—Master Kurayori, the guardian deity of the Shirota household. Imagine Tsumugi’s surprise when he finds out this deity is also his fiancé!

Blurb taken from Baka-Updates .

My Thoughts

I often hesitate to write about yaoi as it has so many problematic issues surrounding it. Just to name a few there are often issues with non-consent, the books often present unrealistic relationships and there is a distinct lack of understanding on how the human body works. To be fair, the same could be said for a large number of m/m romance novels.

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The Tea Dragon Festival by Katie O’Neill

The Tea Dragon Festival

by Katie O’Neill.

Publisher: Link

Amazon: Link.

Goodreads: Link.

Book Depository: Link.


Rinn has grown up with the Tea Dragons that inhabit their village, but stumbling across a real dragon turns out to be a different matter entirely! Aedhan is a young dragon who was appointed to protect the village but fell asleep in the forest eighty years ago. With the aid of Rinn’s adventuring uncle Erik and his partner Hesekiel, they investigate the mystery of his enchanted sleep, but Rinn’s real challenge is to help Aedhan come to terms with feeling that he cannot get back the time he has lost.

Taken from book blurb

Length: 136 Pages.

Series: Tea Dragon #2.

Genre: Graphic Novel. Fantasy.

Read as an: eBook.


My Thoughts

The Tea Dragon Festival tells the story of Rinn and Aedhan, a recently awoken dragon. Once charged to protect the village, Aedham accidentally slept for 80 years. Now that he has awoken he explores the village with Rinn, trying to make up for lost time.

For those that have read the first book in the ‘Tea Dragon’ series, the characters Erik and Hesekiel will be familiar to you. This prequel is just as sweet and beautiful as first book, The Tea Dragon Society. While it is a prequel story, it can really be read in any order.

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The Tea Dragon Society by Katie O’Neill

The Tea Dragon Society

by Katie O’Neill.

Publisher: Link

Goodreads: Link.


From the award-winning author of Princess Princess Ever After comes The Tea Dragon Society, a charming all-ages book that follows the story of Greta, a blacksmith apprentice, and the people she meets as she becomes entwined in the enchanting world of tea dragons. 

After discovering a lost tea dragon in the marketplace, Greta learns about the dying art form of tea dragon care-taking from the kind tea shop owners, Hesekiel and Erik. As she befriends them and their shy ward, Minette, Greta sees how the craft enriches their lives—and eventually her own.

Taken from book blurb

Length: 72 Pages.

Series: Tea Dragon #1.

Genre: Graphic Novel. Fantasy.

Read as an: Hardcover.


My Thoughts

The Tea Dragon Society is a super cute and sweet graphic novel. The story reads almost like a fairytale with its structure and almost vague narrative, what separates The Tea Dragon Society from other stories is the fantastic art and emotional story telling.

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The Bravest Knight Who Ever Lived by Daniel Errico and Shiloh Penfield

The Bravest Knight Who Ever Lived

Written by Daniel Errico.

Illustrated by Shiloh Penfield.

Publisher: link.

Goodreads: link.

|| Book Depository || Amazon || Booktopia ||


Now a HULU Original Series! 

Knights, dragons, and princesses are the things all good fairytales are made of, but what happens when the tale has an LGBTQ ending? Follow Cedric on his journey from his days on a humble pumpkin farm to the adventures that lead him to become a full-fledged knight. Once a knight, discover how he uses his cleverness and courage to vanquish a fire-breathing dragon and rescue a beautiful prince and princess. It is only then does Sir Cedric face his most difficult challenge. Will he follow his heart, and prove that sometimes the bravest thing you can do is choose for yourself how your fairy tale ends?

Taken from book blurb

Release Date: 28th April, 2019.

Length: 40 pages.

Series: N/A. Although the book is now a Cartoon series on Hulu.

Genre: Picture Book. QUILTBAG.

Read as: eBook.

Sourced: NetGalley.


My Thoughts

The Bravest Knight Who Ever Lived is a quick, cute, and LGBTQ positive picture book that tells the story of a boy who grew up on a pumpkin farm and how he became a knight. The picture book is written in rhyming verse and is full of cute illustrations that match the story.

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Long Lost Review: Scott Pilgrim’s Precious Little Life by Bryan Lee O’Malley

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Scott Pilgrim, Volume 1: Scott Pilgrim’s Precious Little Life

Bryan Lee O’Malley.

Scott Pilgrim’s life is totally sweet. He’s 23 years old, he’s in a rockband, he’s “between jobs” and he’s dating a cute high school girl. Nothing could possibly go wrong, unless a seriously mind-blowing, dangerously fashionable, rollerblading delivery girl named Ramona Flowers starts cruising through his dreams and sailing by him at parties. Will Scott’s awesome life get turned upside-down? Will he have to face Ramona’s seven evil ex-boyfriends in battle? The short answer is yes. The long answer is Scott Pilgrim, Volume 1: Scott Pilgrim’s Precious Little Life 

Taken from book blurb

Just throwing it out there, I read the first few books of this before watching the movie. My memories of the book though are coloured extensively by the movie. It doesn’t help that I’m a fan of everything Edgar Wright does so when I say extensively coloured, I mean extensively coloured. Most of my memories of the book relate to the film 😅

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Favourites: The Art of the Didgeridoo

The Art of the Didgeridoo: Music for Didgeridoo and Orchestra

Purchase: link.

Spotify: link.


Blurb: The didgeridoo is recognised around the world as an iconic part of the traditional music of Indigenous Australia, its rich, full tones seeming to evoke the breadth of the land itself. This album is a celebration of that ancient voice, and the music it has inspired from Australia’s great composers.


The Art of the Didgeridoo features performances by legendary player William Barton, including recordings which trace his relationship with one of Australia’s greatest composers, Peter Sculthorpe. Barton’s collaborations with Matthew Hindson, Sean O’Boyle and his mother Delmae Barton showcase the vastly different sounds of the didgeridoo, and Barton’s own innovative music runs throughout the album. Matthew Doyle’s performance of Dawn Mantras by Ross Edwards closes the album – a work which was written to herald the new millennium in a performance from the sails of the Sydney Opera House. This moment was viewed throughout the world, and music that has lost none of its resonance over a decade later.

Taken from ABC Music

Length: 14 Tracks

Genre: Classical and Indigenous Fusion


Why is it a favourite?

I am a fan of classical music and the moment I heard a song from this album on ABC Classic I was hooked. The sound of the didgeridoo by itself or in traditional Aboriginal songs has such an amazing depth, I really love the sound the instrument makes. Build an orchestral arrangement behind this sound and you have struck gold.

The Art of the Didgeridoo not only showcases the instrument but it demonstrates the range the instrument has and the ways in which it can make beautiful music. ‘The Concerto for Didgeridoo’ songs are powerful ones which demonstrate the breadth of not only the Australian land but the ways in which the orchestra and Didgeridoo can work together to paint stunning soundscapes.

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Quick Non-Fic Reviews – Sustainability

I have a terrible habit of borrowing books from the library and then either not reading them at all or only skimming them. As I work in a library and am surrounded by books and borrow waay too many, I thought I would try and force myself to read some of the books I borrow.

So the below are some non fiction books that have caught my eye and I have given a quick read. Since I do this so often I’ve decided to group them together into themes, so enjoy the first: Sustainability (with a side note of creativity)


Sustainability

Waste Not by Erin Rhoads

I have been quite interested recently in how I can reduce my personal waste and be more ecologically responsible. Waste Not was a pretty decent book about steps individuals can take in order to throw away less. I didn’t read the entirety of the book but I did take away a number of things that I can do as an individual such as newspaper bin liners, having a set of my own cutlery, and challenging myself to go completely plastic free (which I am making a big effort to do).

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