Quick Picks: M/M Romance novels

Pride Month

QUICK Picks

I am a sucker for romance novels ❤ Even more so if they’re ones with QUILTBAG characters. Some of my favourite novels from the romance genre, are ones that have two men as the romantic leads.

Don’t get me wrong, I am just as likely to be reading romances with f/f, m/m/f, f/f/m, and how conventional of me m/f pairings. In addition to these, I also have an incredible weakness for romances that feature trans and/or asexual characters.

I have grandiose plans to eventually feature each of these pairings in a similar post. So keep your eye out! In the mean time, the below are just a quick look at some of my favourites from the m/m romance genre. I hope you enjoy.

undermyskinUnder My Skin

by M.L. Rhodes.

Goodreads ||  Author ||  Amazon

The publisher of this series has stopped operating, however the book is scheduled for re-release within either 2018 or 2019. 

Quick story run down: Sebastian Keller is a straight laced ‘smart guy’ who runs his own travel book shop. Dylan Radamacher is the bad boy owner of the ‘Rad Tattoo’ store that just opened up next to Sebastian.

In a book that combines two stories, you see Sebastian and Dylan break down their misconceptions of each other. As they both learn more about each other, you see their walls fall down as the pair start to hit it off. A sweet and sexy romance story follows.

Quick reasons why I love the book:

  • Cute characters: From beginning to end Sebastian and Dylan make me smile.
  • Enemies to lovers: I’m a sucker for that trope and while the pair may not have been enemies, there was some understandable animosity between them.
  • Re-readability: I found this book about eight years ago and I have re-read it some many times. I caved and tracked down a physical copy.

Continue reading “Quick Picks: M/M Romance novels”

Mercs! by Dorian Dawes

Pride Month

MercscoverMercs!

by Dorian Dawes.

Goodreads: link.

Six Word Summary: A conflicting and emotional adventure awaits!

Publisher || Book Depository ||  Amazon  ||  Booktopia  ||  Kobo


Blurb: Famous bounty hunter Talisha Artul is not having a good day. A hostile alien planet full of bandits and refugees, an entire group of mercenaries all told to kill her and take her armor, and it’s barely even noon. All she wanted was to earn a paycheck and make her mother proud. They’ve barely shared a kind word since she came out of the closet as trans and took her mother’s name.

Now she’s travelling with an android cowboy with split-personality issues and an eight-foot-tall warrior woman to beat a group of vengeful pirates and the galactic federation’s military forces to uncover an ancient alien temple. Talisha soon learns that despite her legal standing, there is little that separates her from these marginalized cutthroats and outcasts. They’re all victims here, all pawns in their shadowy employer’s game.


Release Date: June 4, 2018.
Length: 274 pages.
Genre: Science Fiction & QUILTBAG.
Read as an: eBook.

My Thoughts: 100% full disclosure: Mercs! is an experience.

Not only is the story a science fiction novel that features a whole range of QUILTBAG characters, but it is an action packed story that will keep you on your toes to the very end. Needless to say, I enjoyed Mercs! Continue reading “Mercs! by Dorian Dawes”

Anticipated Arrival: Mell Eight’s The Dragon’s Hoard

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Anticpated arrivals

dragonshoardWhat is it?!

The Dragon’s Hoard is a book that contains the five stories from the series of the same name by Mell Eight. The book includes the stores Finding the Wolf, Breaking the Shackles, Stealing the Dragon, Melting the Ice Witch, and Gathering the Hoard. Each story is a fantastical tale that tells the stories of different dragons and how they fall in love.

It has been a while since I read the stories, so the below descriptions are the blurbs for each story.

Continue reading “Anticipated Arrival: Mell Eight’s The Dragon’s Hoard”

Anticipated Arrival: Prince and Knight by Daniel Haack

Anticpated arrivals

Click the link for a full review of Prince & Knight: link.

What is it?!

Written by Daniel Haack and Illustrated by Stevie Lewis, Prince and Knight is:

A picture book.prince-knight

A fairy tale.

A LGBTI friendly book that tells the story of a Prince and a Knight and how they defeat a monster and find love.

Continue reading “Anticipated Arrival: Prince and Knight by Daniel Haack”

Book Bingo: Four in One

Book Bingo - with stamps

It’s been almost two months since last updating so I have a few more books to cross off the bingo card. Over all this batch of books has been a bit all over the place, I’ve had books I loved, books I hated but mainly the books are ones that I would not have normally read except for the bingo card.

200px-West_lonelyheartsA Forgotten Classic

Miss Lonelyhearts by Nathanael West

To say that this book was unpleasant would be an understatement. It is not that the book is bad, it is more that the book is very depressing, it is from a depressing era (the actual Depression) and is quite upfront with the tragedies that have befallen the people who write into Miss Lonelyheart. The book was quite unsettling and upsetting, after having put it down I have every intention of repressing my memories, here is hoping I can make Miss Lonelyhearts a true forgotten classic.

Continue reading “Book Bingo: Four in One”

Book Bingo: Hamish Steele’s Pantheon

Book Bingo - with stamps

I did not anticipate writing a little review for each book I read but as soon as I finished Hamish Steele’s Pantheon I knew I had to write about it. While I will not be writing a post for each book that I read, I will be posting updates on my progress (if I have made any) in the last week of each month.So keep your eyes peeled for those posts and if I read any more books that blow me away I will write a longer post about it.

Happy reading!

Self Published

Screen_Shot_2014-10-17_at_20.34.40Hamish Steele’s Pantheon: The True Story of the Egyptian Deities.

I just want to start out by saying that Hamish Steele’s Pantheon is hilarious!

All throughout the 179 page graphic novel, I had a wide smile on my face.

The Pantheon is a graphic adaptation of Egyptian myths which include the Creation story, the phallus of Osiris and the conflict between Horus and Set. Steele starts the book with a forward where he discusses his source information and states that he has tried to stay as faithful as possible. Pantheon not only delivers on these stories but it does so in an incredibly entertaining, funny and beautiful way.

The graphic novel falls under the self published category as the project was originally a Kickstarter campaign. I myself contributed and as happy as I was that the project was funded, am overjoyed at the final product I received. It was such an amazing feeling to get to the end of the book and see my name in the backers section.

The writing, art and humour on display in this book is nothing short of genius. The pace of each page flows smoothly and the humour (which is very adult, so not recommended for kiddies) jumps off the page. The style of the art is beautiful, with the simple lines belying the incredible skill of Steele. Pantheon had me laughing out loud, gasping in happy shock (please see page 107) and learning.

I am so happy that I was able to contribute to the creation of this book in some small way. If you are interested in purchasing a copy, I would highly recommend it!

 

w527705A Book about Books

Haruki Murakami’s The Strange Library.

I am part of a book club where each member gets to pick which book we all read. The Strange Library by Haruki Murakami was my pick for the month, however since the book club only meets at the end of each month I will be keeping my lips sealed until after the meet up.

Although since, as with the blog, if I didn’t enjoy the book I probably wouldn’t include it, so there is a hint as to my feelings 😉

Currently Consuming: Megan Derr’s ‘The Lost Gods’

Small Currentrly consuminglostgodsbundle400x600

An epic series that combines fantasy and gay romance in a way that is just as likely to melt your heart as break it.

About: The blurb of Megan Derr‘s The Lost Gods series describes the overarching plot of the books as:

“Nine gods ruled the world, until the ultimate betrayal resulted in their destruction. Now, the world is dying and only by restoring the Lost Gods can it be saved.”

The Lost Gods series follows the lives of a number of characters across five books. Each book details the story of how each of the five countries try to restore the ‘Lost Gods’ of the world.

With each book a new set of characters are introduced, however as the larger storyline of the series unfolds, you start to meet a few of the previous characters. Each book and each ‘God’ explores a number of different themes and story lines; topics such as love, forgiveness, sacrifice, suicide, power, destiny, death, and rebirth are all explored throughout the series.

Why: I am a massive fan of Megan Derr and felt it was time to tackle one her lengthier series. I am currently up to the third book in the series, ‘Stone Rose,’ and am, as ever, enamoured with the characters and the almost effortless storytelling.

Best Bits: The way that Derr mixes tragic themes with romance is nothing short of genius. Over the course of two books I have, with an almost bittersweet sense, watched numbers of characters face hardships and terrible choices with a smile and watery eyes.

As with any of Derr’s novels, they are extremely well written with an amazing cast of believable characters. One thing that I have noticed about Derr is her amazing world creation ability. The worlds that her characters occupy are incredibly detailed and each as multi-faceted as the last.  The sheer range that Derr can write makes each book a very different experience from the last.

Thoughts so far: So far the books have proven to be both character driven and story heavy, but with just the right amount of romance thrown in to keep me reading. Being only half way through ‘Stone Rose,’ I cannot wait to continue to read the series and watch as the larger narrative starts to unfold even further.

LessThanThreePress


If you are interested in reading the series, please check out the Less Than Three Press website, where each book has a small extract available.

William Goldman’s The Princess Bride

The Princess Bride, William GoldmanThe Princess Bride has long been hailed as a cult classic. This opinion is one that I feel is rightly deserved.

At the novel’s heart is a romance story set against the backdrop of a fantastical adventure. The sweeping setting and classic archetypes present within the book are all ones that could be found within a classic fairy-tale. However, the humour and self-referential nature of Goldman’s book prove to elevate the work above this genre and into a deeper, more complex story.

Told through the narration of both the real (and yet fictitious) author Goldman, the novel is one that contains many layers. At the centre of these layers is the story of Westley and Princess Buttercup. Outside of this story, the framing technique of Goldman’s commentary details how he came to reprise the fictional original text, not to mention his own, one again fictional, personal issues.

Where the film, of the same name, is framed with the story of the Grandfather and grandchild, the book instead relates Goldman’s own history in numerous injections that discuss the original text, his family, Hollywood and even the fictional legal battles concerned with publishing the book. As you can see from that above description, the story is a complex and multifaceted one. While certainly off putting at times, the mixture of real life and fantasy (such as the authors real screenwriting back-list and the instructions on how to receive a copy of a missing chapter) only adds to the books appeal.

The book is not only the classic and well known tale, it is one full of lovely imagery and delightful prose. Simple lines such as ‘It was a very long and very green night’ (30th Anniversary 2007 edition, pg. 57) which is in reference to a jealous night spent by Buttercup, litter the novel and demonstrate the simple yet elegant style. At moments the writing can be poetic, humourous, and even metaphysical; through it all though it is both simple to read yet complexly crafted. The story and characters created by Goldman are a pleasure to read and over time each interjection only adds to the rich narrative surrounding the title.

In regards to reading the novel I will offer the one suggestion of skipping the first two introductions in the special editions of the book, as they can be initially off putting. These sections are best left for after the book is finished and you are well versed on the writing style and voice of Goldman.

If you are expecting a cut and dry fairy-tale from The Princess Bride, then prepare to die be surprised. For it is so much more.