International Women’s Day!

Sunday 8 March is International Women’s Day. On this day, people everywhere celebrate the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. The day also marks a call to action for accelerating women’s equality.

This year the theme is #EachForEqual.

The IWD 2020 campaign theme is drawn from a notion of ‘Collective Individualism.’

We are all parts of a whole. Our individual actions, conversations, behaviours and mindsets can have an impact on our larger society.

Collectively, we can make change happen. Collectively, we can each help to create a gender equal world. 

We can all choose to be #EachforEqual.

Taken from the IWD webpage

What better way to celebrate inspiring women everywhere than by picking up a book written by or about inspiring women! Check out my below categories and recommended reads for International Women’s Day.

Auto-Biographies

Crack open an auto-biography written about and by an inspiring woman! I made the decision to use ‘auto-biographies’ as these are examples of women telling their own stories – using their own voices.

  • Becoming by Michelle Obama – “In a life filled with meaning and accomplishment, Michelle Obama has emerged as one of the most iconic and compelling women of our era.”
  • I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou – “Loving the world, she also knows its cruelty. As a black woman she has known discrimination and extreme poverty, but also hope and joy, achievement and celebration.”
  • Women, Equality, Power by Helen Clark – while not technically an autobiography, this book contains powerful speeches made by the ex New Zealand Prime Minster.
  • Yes Please by Amy Poehler – “Yes Please offers up a big juicy stew of personal stories, funny bits on sex and love and friendship and parenthood and real life advice (some useful, some not so much), like when to be funny and when to be serious.”

Feminist Works

What better ways to fight for equality than by reading some important pieces of feminist literature. Except for Germaine Greer because fuck her.

  • Fight Like a Girl by Clementine Ford – “Fight Like A Girl will make you laugh, cry and scream. But above all it will make you demand and fight for a world in which women have real equality and not merely the illusion of it.”
  • The Vagina Monologues by Eve Ensler – “I decided to talk to women about their vaginas, to do vagina interviews, which became vagina monologues.”
  • A Vindication of the Rights of Woman by Mary Wollstonecraft – “Writing in an age when the call for the rights of man had brought revolution to America and France, Mary Wollstonecraft produced her own declaration of female independence in 1792. Passionate and forthright, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman attacked the prevailing view of docile, decorative femininity, and instead laid out the principles of emancipation.”
  • We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie – “With humour and levity, here Adichie offers readers a unique definition of feminism for the twenty-first century—one rooted in inclusion and awareness.”

Herstory Books

Recently there have been a number of books that compilate and celebrate the hidden histories of inspiring and often ‘rebellious’ women. Find out more about these inspiring women who have been hidden away in history.

  • Bygone Badass Broads by Mackenzi Lee – “With tales of heroism and cunning, in-depth bios and witty storytelling, Bygone Badass Broads gives new life to these historic female pioneers. Starting in the fifth century BC and continuing to the present, the book takes a closer look at bold and inspiring women who dared to step outside the traditional gender roles of their time. “
  • Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls by Elena Favilli – “Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls is a children’s book packed with 100 bedtime stories about the life of 100 extraordinary women from the past and the present, illustrated by 60 female artists from all over the world.”
  • What Would She Do? by Kay Woodward – “From historic world leaders to brilliant scientists, artists, and modern-day pioneers, What Would She Do? shares twenty-five incredible women’s stories that educate and empower.”
  • A Galaxy of Her Own by Libby Jackson – “From small steps to giant leaps, A Galaxy of Her Own tells fifty stories of inspirational women who have been fundamental to the story of humans in space, from scientists to astronauts to some surprising roles in between.

Powerful Fiction

Pick up a fiction featuring strong women, women asking questions of themselves, or simply kick arse fiction with a feminist frame!

  • The Colour Purple by Alice Walker – “A powerful cultural touchstone of modern American literature, The Color Purple depicts the lives of African American women in early twentieth-century rural Georgia. Separated as girls, sisters Celie and Nettie sustain their loyalty to and hope in each other across time, distance and silence.”
  • Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur – A kick butt poetry book “is a collection of poetry and prose about survival. About the experience of violence, abuse, love, loss, and femininity.”
  • My Brilliant Career by Miles Franklin – “The fierce, irreverent novel of aspiration and rebellion that is both a cornerstone of Australian literature and a feminist classic.”
  • Queenie by Candice Carty-Williams – “With “fresh and honest” prose, Queenie is a remarkably relatable exploration of what it means to be a modern woman searching for meaning in today’s world.”

Did you enjoy the post? Are there any inspiring books that you would recommend? Leave a comment and let me know!

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